Regeneration

Regeneration

Design Council appoints new Director of Architecture and the Built Environment

The Design Council has appointed Clare Devine as its new director of architecture and the built environment. The Design Council states that ‘Clare has 25 years experience in architecture and has been a director of three practices working in fields of housing, regeneration, education, public, civic and cultural buildings.’

For full details see here

National Tourism Conference

Culture-Heritage-Tourism: Developing the Product
Blenheim Palace: 16 March



The Historic Towns Forum, supported by VisitEngland, is delighted to announce the date of their National Tourism Conference, to be held at Blenheim Palace on 16 March 2012.

This conference is the first of a programme of events to celebrate the 25th year of the Historic Towns Forum, and comes on the last day of the first English Tourism Week promoted by VisitEngland.

This practical event will demonstrate the links between Tourism, Heritage and Culture, and will offer strong models to develop resilient and innovative tourism in our historic towns and cities in spite of the economic climate.

Keynote speakers include Lady Cobham, Chair of VisitEngland, high profile politicians and leading figures within the industry. Subjects covered will be as wide-ranging as robust business modelling, addressing the skills' gap, how to link existing culture and heritage into a saleable product. Speakers will also give advice on how to deliver information to visitors, how to manage tourism locally, and how to maximise the offer leading up to a year which includes the Queen's Diamond Jubilee and the 2012 Games.

SPACES ARE LIMITED AND IN HIGH DEMAND FOR THIS EXCLUSIVE EVENT
BOOK SOON TO SECURE YOUR PLACE!

 

Who should attend

Local Authority elected members and officers from all disciplines; Community, Parish and Town Councils; community leaders and representatives of community groups; civic and amenity societies; professionals concerned with all aspects of planning, conservation, tourism, heritage, culture, traffic management, urban design and economic development; all tourism professionals and anyone working in the tourism, heritage and cultural sectors.

 

Conference Venue:

Blenheim Palace, Woodstock, Oxfordshire OX20 1PP

 

Programme

Friday 16 March

   
09.00 Registration/tea/coffee    
09.25 Welcome and Introduction   Debbie Dance, Chair, Historic Towns Forum
09.30 Message to the delegates   His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales
09.40 Keynote Speech   Penelope, Viscountess Cobham – Chairman, VisitEngland
10.00 The Battle for Blenheim – developing a successful business model   John Hoy, Chief Executive, Blenheim Palace
10.30 Training, customer service, visitor experience   Gerry Brown, Head of Strategic Training & Operations, People1st
11.00 Q&A    
11.20 Tea/Coffee/Networking/Exhibitions    
11.50 Yorkshire Passions - bespoke training play   John Godber, Playwright
with Janet Reuben and assorted actors
12.35 Q&A    
13.00 Lunch    
14.00 Panel:
Local tourism - information as a product - how to develop and deliver
  Michele Grant, Director, Blue Sail
Sally Broom, Co-founder and CEO, TripBod
Susi Golding, Director, Visit Oxfordshire
15.00 Q&A    
15.20 Tea/Coffee/Networking/Exhibitions    
15.50 Panel:
Where culture, heritage and tourism connect - 3 case studies
  Paul Brookes, Cultural Olympiad London 2012, East Midlands
Jane Finnis, CEO, Culture24
John Fleming, Director, Ludlow Marches Food and Drink Festival
16.50 Q&A    
17.00 Plenary   Debbie Dance, Chair, Historic Towns Forum
17.05 Champagne tour of Blenheim Palace    

BOOK YOUR PLACE HERE
When you click the 'add to basket' button you will be taken to our secure shopping basket, you can return to this page at any point to add more items to your basket.  You will then be prompted to fill in all your details and select your payment method (bacs, cheque, credit/debit card or PayPal).

Alternatively, if you would prefer to book over the phone, please call 0117 975 0459, 9am - 5pm Monday to Friday.  Methods of payment for telephone bookings - cheque or bacs only.

If you are a student and wish to attend, please contact us on the above number.

  HTF Members Non Members
Delegate 1 £149
 
£209 Earlybird fee
Back to non members' fees
Delegate 2
(from same organisation)
£119
 
£179 Earlybird fee
Back to non members' fees

Check if your organisation is a member.
Ask us for a reminder of your login details
Please call 0117 975 0459 if you have any queries or would like to discuss membership.

 

Historic find in Co Clare

Archaeologists in County Clare believe they have discovered Ireland’s earliest surviving example of a timber framed house.

Dendrochronological analysis is expected to conclude that the timber structure at Chapel Lane, Parnell Street, Ennis, dates back to the late 16th century.

Ms. Irene Clune’s house, known as McParland’s, is long understood to have been the oldest inhabited house in the Clare County capital. The building’s triple diamond stone Jacobean chimney has been an icon of medieval Ennis for centuries.

The house was first inspected in 2008 by Clare County Council’s Conservation Officer, who recommended that the property undergo structural repair work. Following detailed technical analyses by the National Monuments Service and officials from Ennis Town Council and Consulting Conservation Engineers, it was concluded that the structure was unstable and represented a danger to the general public.

Ennis Town Council, using its statutory powers to deal with dangerous buildings, commenced a €170,000 project to make the building safe and to protect and restore the historic fabric of the structure. A grant of €85,000 was procured under the “Structures at Risk Scheme” from the Department of the Environment towards the restoration project.

During October 2011, the gable and chimney were carefully recorded, taken down and stored. At present the historic gable is being re-built using the original stones bedded in an authentic hydraulic-lime mortar, the floor of the house having been archaeologically excavated prior to this.

In recent weeks, archaeologists have discovered an oak frame structure which they have described as “potentially one of the most exciting urban archaeological discoveries in Ireland in recent years”.

Frank Coyne, Consultant Archaeologist from Aegis Archaeology Ltd, explained that the limited archaeological excavation has revealed a wealth of information.

“The existence of a foundation cut in the interior of the house indicates an earlier structure on the site, which is also borne out by the presence of large oak beams in the walls of the house. It is hugely significant that these beams are oak, which will enable us to use tree ring dating. If these prove to be of medieval date, which we believe is the case, then this means that this house is the only structure of its type in the county”, explained Mr. Coyne.

Commenting on the restoration project, Mayor of Ennis, Councillor Michael Guilfoyle, stated: “The works to McParland’s, when completed, will yield invaluable information on the traditional skills and construction techniques of Late Medieval Ennis. This work makes the building safe and protects a major piece of the history and character of Ennis. I have no doubt that the building will continue to be of tremendous interest to all those who have an appreciation of the importance of our heritage and the very fine examples of medieval architecture in the town.”

According to HTF Member David Humphreys of ACP Consultant Conservation Engineers, “Although built originally using crude rubble stone and weak mortar, the fact that this building has stayed intact up to the present is a tribute to the skills of the medieval masons, who possessed a great knowledge of their materials and confidence in their designs”.

Conservation Officer Dick Cronin noted that the present discoveries at McParland’s further enhance Ennis’ status as the most intact medieval town in Ireland.

Restoration work at McParland’s, Parnell Street, Ennis, Co Clare, is scheduled for completion in February 2012.

The Portas Review

At the end of 2008, the average town centre vacancy was under 6%, but at the end of 2010 it was 14.5%. If the decline continues at this rate in two years’ time almost a third of UK high streets will be standing empty.  So say studies carried out by the Deparment of Business and Innovation.

Mary Portas, star of shows such as Mary Queen of Shops and Mary Queen of Frocks has been asked by Government to advise on issues such as how to address the problem of vacant shops, prevent the proliferation of ‘clone towns’, and increase the number of small and independent retailers in local town centres.

Ms Portas is expected to finish her investigations by the end of the year and is due to report to Government on Tuesday 13 December.

Mary has received nearly 2,000 comments on her website from members of the public and high street retailers since the review began.

Findings from two HTF/EH workshops attended by a wide range of property professionals, retail practitioners and partnership organisations will also fed into the report.

High Street Review Out

According to ATCM studies, if the current highstreet decline continues almost a third of UK high streets will be standing empty in two years' time. So say studies carried out by Department of Businesses and Innovation.

Mary Portas, star of shows such as Mary Queen of Shops and Mary Queen of Frocks, has been asked to advise Government to advise on issues such as how to address the problem of vacant shops, prevent the proliferation of ‘clone towns’, and how to increase the number of small and independent retailers in local town centres.

Ms Portas is expected to finish her investigations by the end of the year and reported to Government on Tuesday 13 December.

Findings from two HTF/EH workshops attended by a wide range of property professionals, retail practitioners and partnership organisations fed into the report. 

The Portas Review was published on 13 December. The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) has announced that the Government will respond to the review in the Spring. For inclusion in the ATCM offical position please read the review and send your comments to Ojay.McDonald@atcm.org

An HTF conference on this subject will take place on 23 March. Register your interest.

Members' Special Offer: Ancoats - cradle of industrialisation

Title Ancoats - cradle of industrialisation
Authors Keith Falconer, Mike Rose and Julian Holder
Publisher English Heritage in partnership with Heritage Works Buildings Preservation Trust
Published September 2011
ISBN 978-1-84802-027-6
Price £9.99 + p&p
HTF Members offer £8.99 inc. p&p 
(quote 'HTF11') Offer closes 30 November 2011
To order Telephone: 0845 458 9910 or Email: eh@centralbooks.com 
Ancoats, situated north east of Manchester on the Rochdale and Ashton canals, has an unique place in the history of both global industrialisation and urbanisation. In the 19th Century it was home to many multi-storied steam-driven cotton mills and this book details its rise and decline as an industrial powerhouse.
 
The book intends to raise awareness of the wide range and varied character of the historic mills, buildings and canals which constitute the Ancoats townscape, and the forces and trends which have contributed to its appearance. It outlines, through its buildings, how the area and its community have evloved over the last 250 years.
 
Planners and conservation officers dealing with regeneration issues will find this book of great interest.

Ancoats - cradle of industrialisation

Title Ancoats - cradle of industrialisation
Authors Keith Falconer, Mike Rose and Julian Holder
Publisher English Heritage in partnership with Heritage Works Buildings Preservation Trust
Published September 2011
ISBN 978-1-84802-027-6
Price £9.99 + p&p
HTF Members offer £8.99 inc. p&p 
(Members' Special Offer code) Offer closes 30 November 2011
To order Telephone: 0845 458 9910 or Email: eh@centralbooks.com 
Ancoats, situated north east of Manchester on the Rochdale and Ashton canals, has an unique place in the history of both global industrialisation and urbanisation. In the 19th Century it was home to many multi-storied steam-driven cotton mills and this book details its rise and decline as an industrial powerhouse.
 
The book intends to raise awareness of the wide range and varied character of the historic mills, buildings and canals which constitute the Ancoats townscape, and the forces and trends which have contributed to its appearance. It outlines, through its buildings, how the area and its community have evloved over the last 250 years.
 
Planners and conservation officers dealing with regeneration issues will find this book of great interest.

Country House Rescue for Channel 4

Channel Four is looking for people who own historic or country houses to take part in the fourth series of Country House Rescue. As ever, the programme will follow the fortunes of a number of stately British homes as the owners seek to diversify and raise the revenue they need to survive.

Each hour-long programme will feature one house over a six month period. Each film will show the journey that many country home owners have to face - seeking appropriate ways of keeping up with the bills and ensuring that these homes stay afloat, which will allow their families, and the nation, to enjoy them for generations to come.

We're looking for owners of historic homes around the country who would be interested in taking part. From those who are looking to diversify for the first time and don't know where to turn, to those who've started the process but have run out of ideas and money and would value our advice, we would like to hear from you all.

Owners should be open to the idea of how their home can work as a business and be willing to explore ways to achieve that goal.

If you would like to find out more, please call Sam on 020 7290 0660 or email countryhouserescue@betty.co.uk as soon as possible.